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Book about ordination in ecology

Book about ordination in ecology


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This is a question I posted on Cross Validated few weeks ago but no response has been given so far.

I am looking for a book that would cover a lot of different ordinations techniques (indirect gradient analysis e.g. PCA, CA, DCA, MDS, nMDS but also direct gradient analysis e.g. CCA, CCorA, RDA) with applications in ecology (with R would be better) and mostly focusing on these methods.

I think " Numerical Ecology " by Legendre & Legendre (https://www.elsevier.com/books/numerical-ecology/legendre/978-0-444-53868-0#) would be relevant but it seems to cover a very extensive number of topics. Any other idea ?


I took a class in ordination methods a few months ago and found the following books helpful in better understanding the various techniques:

Multivariate Statistical Methods: A Primer by Brian Manley https://www.crcpress.com/Multivariate-Statistical-Methods-A-Primer-Fourth-Edition/Manly-Alberto/p/book/9781498728966

Correspondence Analysis in Practice by Michael Greenacre (this is somewhat more in-depth for forms of CA) https://www.crcpress.com/Correspondence-Analysis-in-Practice-Third-Edition/Greenacre/p/book/9781498731775

Multivariate Statistics for Wildlife and Ecology Research by McGarigal, Cushman, and Stafford https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9780387988917

Numerical Ecology is really excellent, even if it covers a broad number of topics. I focused on the ordination methods and found it to be very straightforward. Check out the McGarigal et al. book if you are interested in seeing examples of application in ecology.


You might also want to consider:

  1. Tree diversity analysis by Kindt and Coe 2005. Freely and legally available here. Not very deep but nice and crisp introductions + its free.

  2. Numerical Ecology with R by Borcard et al. 2018; https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-1-4419-7976-6 Little brother of Legendre and Legendre 2012. Excellent book with many examples in the R language. Also very up to date as it was released this year.

  3. Analyzing Ecological Data by Zuur et al 2007; https://www.springer.com/us/book/9780387459677. Also a nice book covering the basics of ordination in ecology.


Ecology: Concepts and Applications 8th Edition

This book was written for students taking their first undergraduate course in ecology. We have assumed that students in this one-semester course have some knowledge of basic chemistry and mathematics and have had a course in general biology, which included introductions to evolution, physiology, and biological diversity.

Organization of the Book

An evolutionary perspective forms the foundation of the entire textbook, as it is needed to support understanding of major concepts. The textbook begins with a brief introduction to the nature and history of the discipline of ecology, followed by section I, which includes two chapters on earthâ&euro&trades biomesâ&euro&rdquolife on land and life in waterâ&euro&rdquofollowed by a chapter on population genetics and natural selection. Sections II through VI build a hierarchical perspective through the traditional subdisciplines of ecology: section II concerns adaptations to the environment section III focuses on population ecology section IV presents the ecology of interactions section V summarizes community and ecosystem ecology and finally, section VI discusses large-scale ecology, including chapters on landscape, geographic, and global ecology. These topics were first introduced in section I within its discussion of the biomes. In summary, the book begins with an overview of the biosphere, considers portions of the whole in the middle chapters, and ends with another perspective of the entire planet in the concluding chapter. The features of this textbook were carefully planned to enhance the studentsâ&euro&trade comprehension of the broad discipline of ecology.

Features Designed with the Student in Mind

All chapters are based on a distinctive learning system, featuring the following key components: Student Learning Outcomes: Educators are being asked increasingly to develop concrete student learning outcomes for courses across the curriculum. In response to this need and to help focus student progress through the content, all sections of each chapter in the eighth edition begin with a list of detailed student learning outcomes.

Introduction: The introduction to each chapter presents the student with the flavor of the subject and important background information. Some introductions include historical events related to the subject others present an example of an ecological process. All attempt to engage students and draw them into the discussion that follows.

Concepts: The goal of this book is to build a foundation of ecological knowledge around key concepts, which are listed at the beginning of each chapter to alert the student to the major topics to follow and to provide a place where the student can find a list of the important points covered in each chapter. The sections in which concepts are discussed focus on published studies and, wherever possible, the scientists who did the research are introduced. This case-study approach supports the concepts with evidence, and introduces students to the methods and people that have created the discipline of ecology. Each concept discussion ends with a series of concept review questions to help students test their knowledge and to reinforce key points made in the discussion.

Do you like this book? Please share with your friends, let's read it !! :)


Tentative Schedule

Week Day Date Topic & Reading Summary Discussion
1 Mon Sept. 25 Intro to R & RStudio Tad & Jes ————
Wed Sept. 27 Topic selection, Intro to R markdown & class website Tad & Jes ————
Fri Sept. 29 R workshop (optional) Jes ————
2 Mon Oct. 2 Intro to ggplot2 and tidyr Jes ————
Wed Oct. 4 Intro to GitHub & git Jes ————
Fri Oct. 6 Each person introduces their questions & data Tad & Jes ————
3 Mon Oct. 9 Topic 1. Data exploration Tad Priscilla
Wed Oct. 11 Topic 2. Linear models Tad Sandra
Fri Oct. 13 Topic 3. Dealing with heterogeneity Tad Anna
4 Mon Oct. 16 Topic 4. Mixed-effects models with nested data Tad Beth
Wed Oct. 18 Topic 5. GLM with binary & proportional data Tad Meghan
Fri Oct. 20 Topic 6. GLM with zero-inflated data Tad Nick
5 Mon Oct. 23 Topic 7. Bayesian linear models Jes Jamie
Wed Oct. 25 Topic 8. Bayesian inference with prior information Jes Nicole
Fri Oct. 27 Topic 9. Advanced Bayesian model example Jes Lizzie
6 Mon Oct. 30 Topic 10. Unconstrained ordination Tad Anna
Wed Nov. 1 Topic 11. Constrained ordination Tad Jamie
Fri Nov. 3 Topic 12. Comparing multivariate data (symmetric methods) Jes Priscilla
7 Mon Nov. 6 Mid-term project presentation & discussion
Wed Nov. 8 Mid-term project presentation & discussion
Fri Nov. 10 Mid-term project presentation & discussion
8 Mon Nov. 13 Topic 13. Visualization of spatial data Tad Tyler
Wed Nov. 15 Topic 14. Spatial regression Jes Marissa
Fri Nov. 17 Topic 15. Ordination approach to spatial analysis Jes Sandra
RECESS Thanksgiving
9 Mon Nov. 27 Topic 16. Selected by class: time-series analysis Lizzie
Wed Nov. 29 Topic 17. Selected by class: network analysis Beth Nicole
Fri Dec. 1 Topic 18. Selected by class: occupancy models Nick
10 Mon Dec. 4 Final project presentations
Wed Dec. 6 Final project presentations
Fri Dec. 8 Final project presentations

Some possible additional topics: Cluster analysis, Series analysis, structural equation models, occupancy models, phylogenetic contrasts, rarefaction, null models for community analysis, multi-model inference and averaging


Foundations of Ecology

Assembled here for the first time in one volume are forty classic papers that have laid the foundations of modern ecology. Whether by posing new problems, demonstrating important effects, or stimulating new research, these papers have made substantial contributions to an understanding of ecological processes, and they continue to influence the field today.

The papers span nearly nine decades of ecological research, from 1887 on, and are organized in six sections: foundational papers, theoretical advances, synthetic statements, methodological developments, field studies, and ecological experiments. Selections range from Connell’s elegant account of experiments with barnacles to Watt’s encyclopedic natural history, from a visionary exposition by Grinnell of the concept of niche to a seminal essay by Hutchinson on diversity.

Six original essays by contemporary ecologists and a historian of ecology place the selections in context and discuss their continued relevance to current research. This combination of classic papers and fresh commentaries makes Foundations of Ecology both a convenient reference to papers often cited today and an essential guide to the intellectual and conceptual roots of the field.

Published with the Ecological Society of America.

Preface
Part One - Foundational Papers
Defining Ecology as a Science
Sharon E. Kingsland

1. Stephen A. Forbes (1887)
The Lake as a Microcosm
(Bulletin of the Peoria Scientific Association, pp. 77-87. Reprinted in the Bulletin of the Illinois State Natural History Survey 15 (1925): 537-50

2. Henry Chandler Cowles (1899)
The Ecological Relations of the Vegetation on the Sand Dunes of Lake Michigan
The Botanical Gazette 27 : 97-117, 167-202, 281-308, 361-91

3. Frederic E. Clements (1936)
Nature and Structure of the Climax
The Journal of Ecology 24 : 252-84

4. H. A. Gleason (1926)
The Individualistic Concept of the Plant Association
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 53 : 7-26

5. Joseph Grinnell (1917)
The Niche-Relationships of the California Thrasher
The Auk 34 : 427-33

6. A. J. Nicholson and V. A. Bailey (1935)
The Balance of Animal Populations, Part I
Proceeding of the Zoological Society, London, no. 3, pp. 551-98

Part Two - Theoretical Advances
The Role of Theory in the Rise of Modern Ecology
Leslie A. Real and Simon A. Levin

8. Frank W. Preston (1962)
The Canonical Distribution of Commonness and Rarity, Part I
Ecology 43 : 185-215, 431-32

9. G. Evelyn Hutchinson (1957)
Concluding Remarks
Population Studies: Animal Ecology and Demography. Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 22 : 415-27

10. Lamont C. Cole (1954)
The Population Consequences of Life History Phenomena
The Quarterly Review of Biology 29 : 103-37

11. Robert M. May (1974)
Biological Populations with Non-Overlapping Generations: Stable Points, Stable Cycles, and Chaos
Science 186 : 645-47

12. Robert H. MacArthur and Eric R. Pianka (1966)
On Optimal Use of a Patchy Environment
The American Naturalist 100 : 603-9

13. Vito Volterra (1926)
Fluctuations in the Abundance of a Species Considered Mathematically
Nature 118 : 558-60

14. J. G. Skellam (1951)
Random Dispersal in Theoretical Populations
Biometrika 38 : 196-218

Part Three - Theses, Antitheses, and Syntheses
Conversational Biology and Ecological Debate
Joel G. Kingsolver and Robert T. Paine

15. A. G. Tansley (1935)
The Use and Abuse of Vegetational Concepts and Terms
Ecology 16 : 284-307

16. G. E. Hutchinson (1959)
Homage to Santa Rosalia or, Why Are There So Many Kinds of Animals?
The American Naturalist 93 : 145-59
17. Nelson G. Hairston, Frederick E. Smith, and Lawrence B. Slobodkin (1960)
Community Structure, Population Control, and Competition
The American Naturalist 94 : 421-25

18. Paul R. Ehrlich and Peter H. Raven (1964)
Butterflies and Plants: A Study in Coevolution
Evolution 18 : 586-608

19. J. L. Harper (1967)
A Darwinian Approach to Plant Ecology
The Journal of Ecology 55 : 247-70

20. Thomas W. Schoener (1971)
Theory of Feeding Strategies
Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 2 : 369-404

Part Four - Methodological Advances
New Approaches and Methods in Ecology
James H. Brown

21. Lennart von Post (1967 [1916])
Forest Tree Pollen in South Swedish Peat Bog Deposits
Pollen et Spores 9 : 378-401. A translation by Margaret Bryan Davis and Knut Faegri of Om skogstradspollen i sydsvenska torfmosselagerfolijder (foredragsreferat) (Geolgiska Foereningen i Stockholm. Foerhandlingar 38 : 384-34), with an introduction by Knut Faegri and Johs. Iversen

22. P. H. Leslie (1945)
On the Use of Matrices in Certain Population Mathematics
Biometrika 33 : 183-212

23. L. C. Birch (1948)
The Intrinsic Rate of Natural Increase of an Insect Population
The Journal of Animal Ecology 17 : 15-26
 
24. C. S. Holling (1959)
The Components of Predation as Revealed by a Study of Small Mammal Predation of the European Pine Sawfly
The Canadian Entomologist 91 : 293-320

25. Warren P. Porter and David M. Gates (1969)
Thermodynamic Equilibria of Animals with Environment
Ecological Monographs 39 : 227-44

26. J. Roger Bray and J. T. Curtis (1957)
An Ordination of the Upland Forest Communities of Southern Wisconsin
Ecological Monographs 27 : 325-49

27. Eugene P. Odum (1969)
The Strategy of Ecosystem Development
Science 164 : 262-70

Part Five - Case Studies in Natural Systems
Lessons from Nature: Case Studies in Natural Systems
Robert K. Peet

28. J. Davidson and H. G. Andrewartha (1948)
The Influence of Rainfall, Evaporation and Atmospheric Temperature on Fluctuations in the Size of a Natural Population of Thrips Imaginis (Thysanoptera)
The Journal of Animal Ecology 17 : 200-222

29. John M. Teal (1962)
Energy Flow in the Salt Marsh Ecosystem of Georgia
Ecology 43 : 614-24

30. Margaret B. Davis (1969)
Climatic Changes in Southern Connecticut Recorded by Pollen Desposition at Rogers Lake
Ecology 50 : 409-22

31. Alex S. Watt (1947)
Pattern and Process in the Plant Community
The Journal of Ecology 35 : 1-22

32. Robert H. MacArthur (1958)
Population Ecology of Some Warblers of Northeastern Coniferous Forests
Ecology 39 : 599-619

33. John Langdon Brooks and Stanley I. Dodson (1965)
Predation, Body Size, and Composition of Plankton
Science 150 : 28-35

Part Six - Experimental Manipulations in Lab and Field Systems
Manipulative Experiments as Tests of Ecological Theory
Jane Lubchenco and Leslie A. Real

34. H. B. D. Kettlewell (1955)
Selection Experiments on Industrial Melanism in the Lepidoptera
Heredity 9 :323-42

35. Thomas Park (1948)
Experimental Studies of Interspecies Competition. I. Competition between Populations of the Flour Beetles, Tribolium confusum Duvall and Tribolium castaneum Herbst
Ecological Monographs 18 : 267-307
 
36. C. B. Huffaker (1958)
Experimental Studies on Predation: Dispersion Factors and Predator-Prey Oscillations
Hilgardia 27 : 343-83

37. Joseph H. Connell (1961)
The Influence of Interspecific Competition and Other Factors on the Distribution of the Barnacle Chthamalus stellatus
Ecology 42 : 710-23

38. Robert T. Paine (1966)
Food Web Complexity and Species Diversity
The American Naturalist 100 : 65-75

39. Daniel S. Simberloff and Edward O. Wilson (1969)
Experimental Zoogeography of Islands: The Colonization of Empty Islands
Ecology 50 : 278-96

40. Gene E. Likens, F. Herbert Bormann, Noye M. Johnson, D. W. Fisher, and Robert S. Pierce (1970)
Effects of Forest Cutting and Herbicide Treatment on Nutrient Budgets in the Hubbard Brook Watershed-Ecosystem
Ecological Monographs 40 : 23-47


Description

The book describes and discusses the numerical methods which are successfully being used for analysing ecological data, using a clear and comprehensive approach. These methods are derived from the fields of mathematical physics, parametric and nonparametric statistics, information theory, numerical taxonomy, archaeology, psychometry, sociometry, econometry and others. Compared to the first edition of Numerical Ecology, this second edition includes three new chapters, dealing with the analysis of semiquantitative data, canonical analysis and spatial analysis. New sections have been added to almost all other chapters. There are sections listing available computer programs and packages at the end of several chapters. As in the previous English and French editions, there are numerous examples from the ecological literature, and the choice of methods is facilitated by several synoptic tables.


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From the Back Cover

About the Author

Peter Stiling is a professor of biology at the University of South Florida at Tampa. He has taught classes in ecology, environmental science, and community ecology, and in 1995 he received a teaching award in recognition of classroom excellence in these areas. Dr. Soling obtained his Ph.D. from University College, Cardiff, Wales, and completed postdoctoral research at Florida State University. It was while he was teaching ecology at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad that the idea for this book was conceived. Dr. Stiling's research interests include plant-insect relationships, parasite-host relationships, biological control, restoration ecology, and the effects of elevated CO2 levels on native communities. He has published many scientific papers in journals such as Ecology, Oikos, and Oecologia and was an editor for Oecologia. His field research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Nature Conservancy.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Preface

Ecology is a fascinating science. It is the most valuable discipline for learning what causes the distribution of plants and animals on Earth. Knowledge of ecology is vital in taking conservation measures and in attempting to restore the planet after the ravages of pollution. Ecology provides the conceptual framework upon which environmental science is built. Indeed, ecology is to environmental science as physics is to engineering. That is, an engineer cannot build a bridge without knowing the physical principles underlying its construction, and similarly, environmental scientists cannot understand the environment without a sound knowledge of ecological principles.

Ecology is also a broad discipline. It borrows from many areas: from mathematics to build models of population growth, from physiology to understand how organisms live in their environments, from geology to understand soils, from chemistry to understand the chemical defenses of plants, and from genetics to understand the extinction of species. From all these fields, ecology has emerged as a science vital to the very preservation of our planet. Ecology is now a household word this book will help you understand its every facet.

The changes to the fourth edition are substantial. The introduction has been completely rewritten to introduce students to the disciplines of evolutionary and behavioral ecology, population ecology, community ecology, and ecosystems ecology, the four pillars upon which this book is built. The introduction also discusses the methods used in ecological studies, giving examples of how investigators proceed from observation through experimentation to analysis. The section on evolutionary and behavioral ecology has been completely stripped down and refocused on ecology.

The population ecology section maintains its focus on factors affecting population growth, but more space has been allotted to mutualism and commensalism and to parasitism, in order to give balance to the chapters on competition and predation. The community ecology section has been simplified: Complex subjects such as ordination have been omitted, and the focus is now more on worked examples, using actual data sets. In the ecosystems section, I have again reworked all chapters. Here, Chapter 22, on nutrients, addresses the role of chemicals in the distribution of organisms and does not center on the nutrient cycles themselves.

There have been many pedagogical changes. Each chapter starts with its own Road Map , set of brief statements that give a one-sentence outline of what each section in the chapter is about. Many of the tables and figures have been replaced and redrawn using voice balloons, so that the student is instantly alerted to the main point each graphic is making. Nearly 50% of the diagrams in this edition are new, in addition to the scores of new color photographs, each carefully chosen to illustrate a particular point raised in the text.

The format of the chapters in the fourth edition remains similar to that of the last edition. Each chapter begins with an explanation of a concept, followed by examples well illustrated with data, figures, and tables. For example, in Chapter 13, a discussion of indispensable mortality is followed by how this concept relates to sea turtle conservation and how the protection of a few adult sea turtles may actually be much more profitable than protecting dozens of eggs on the beach. Following the examples is a synthesis of the preceding material in the section, with details of a review or a mathematical model, or both, that tell us where the preponderance of the evidence lies and which concept or theory is best supported. A summary at the end of the chapter reiterates the main points and should be a valuable study aid.

Supplements

Instructor's Resource CD-ROM (0-13-092639-6) and Transparency Acetates (0-13-061637-0). Prentice Hall's commitment to a four-color format for this edition of Ecology: Theories and Applications has enabled us to make the diagrams, data graphics, and photographs easier to interpret, and the overall presentation brighter and more accessible. These images are available to the instructor for presentation purposes on an easy-to-use CD-ROM.

Instructor's Resource CD-ROM or as Transparency Acetates. The Instructor's Resource CD-ROM contains every piece of line art from the text formatted for a clear on-screen lecture hall presentation as well as PowerPoint lecture presentations for each chapter. Also available are 150 transparencies. They are labeled with large, boldfaced type for easy reading in the classroom. Professors can receive the Instructor's Resource CD-ROM or the Transparency Acetates by contacting their local Prentice Hall representative or Prentice Hall faculty services at (800) 526-0485.

Student Companion Website (www.prenhall.com/stiling). The companion website for Ecology: Theories and Applications has been revised and expanded. Each unit now features Case Studies that challenge students to pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, analyze data, and draw conclusions. Many tutorials include real data sets from current ecological research projects that students are asked to interpret and analyze. The website also features extensive links to other ecology sites as well as chapter self quizzes that can be submitted to the instructor.

Acknowledgments

I have had many new people help me in this fourth edition, but my first vote of thanks should go to my editor, Teresa Ryu. She raised the production values enabling the book to enjoy full color throughout. My Developmental Editor, Ellen Smith, worked tirelessly with me to make every word and every illustration count for the student. Her attention to detail and quality shows on every page, as she read the text and asked questions like a student. Travis Moses-Westphal, Project Manager, was instrumental in engineering the media and supplements package with much enthusiasm. Brian Baker was meticulous in his copyediting and went well beyond the normal duties of a copy editor, even calling for new illustrations if he felt the need! Robin Manasse labored long and hard to turn my chicken-scratch figures into graceful works of art. She often improved the clarity of my original figures and never complained when I sent her work back with new modifications. Shari Toron, Production Editor, seamlessly wove together the art, photographs, figures, and copyedited manuscript into a bright new ecology text. Finally, I am grateful to the following reviewers of the third edition, who suggested so many of the improvements herein:

Gregory H. Adler, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh
Clifford Amundsen, University of Tennessee
Gerardo B. Camilo, St. Louis University
Mitchell B. Cruzan, University of Tennessee
Richard Deslippe, Texas Tech University
James Drake, University of Tennessee
Leo S. Luckinbill, Wayne State University
Nancy McCreary Waters, Lafayette College
Peter Meserve, Northern Illinois University
L. Maynard Moe, California State University, Bakersfield
John Mull, Weber State University
Katharine Nash Suding, University of Colorado, Boulder
Christopher Paradise, Davidson College
Craig Plante, College of Charleston
Frank Romano, III, Jacksonville State University
Anthony M. Rossi, University of North Florida
Jan Savitz, Loyola University of Chicago
Benjamin Steele, Colby-Sawyer College
William R. Teska, Furman University

Once again, Jacqui Stiling, out of all these people, deserves special credit for her untiring help in preparing the manuscript and supervising the wonderful task of acquiring permissions!


An Introduction to Methods and Models in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology

This unique textbook introduces undergraduate students to quantitative models and methods in ecology, behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology, and conservation. It explores the core concepts shared by these related fields using tools and practical skills such as experimental design, generating phylogenies, basic statistical inference, and persuasive grant writing. And contributors use examples from their own cutting-edge research, providing diverse views to engage students and broaden their understanding.

This is the only textbook on the subject featuring a collaborative “active learning” approach that emphasizes hands-on learning. Every chapter has exercises that enable students to work directly with the material at their own pace and in small groups. Each problem includes data presented in a rich array of formats, which students use to answer questions that illustrate patterns, principles, and methods. Topics range from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and population effective size to optimal foraging and indices of biodiversity. The book also includes a comprehensive glossary.

In addition to the editors, the contributors are James Beck, Cawas Behram Engineer, John Gaskin, Luke Harmon, Jon Hess, Jason Kolbe, Kenneth H. Kozak, Robert J. Robertson, Emily Silverman, Beth Sparks-Jackson, and Anton Weisstein.

  • Provides experience with hypothesis testing, experimental design, and scientific reasoning
  • Covers core quantitative models and methods in ecology, behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology, and conservation
  • Turns “discussion sections” into “thinking labs”

Professors: A supplementary Instructor’s Manual is available for this book. It is restricted to teachers using the text in courses. For information on how to obtain a copy, refer to: https://press.princeton.edu/class_use/solutions.html

"Braude and Low provide a survey of a wide variety of extended exercises in evolutionary biology, population ecology, population genetics, and statistical analysis. Individual chapters can also serve as useful supplement assignments in many introductory biology courses."Choice

"[This book] is for people like me—faculty members who will buy it and then tinker with, modify, adapt, or steal outright the exercises it contains for use in their own relatively narrowly focused courses. And that is actually a valuable contribution to American biological education!"—Arthur M. Shapiro, Quarterly Review of Biology

"I liked An Introduction to Methods and Models in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology, and think it would be a very good text in the classroom. This book is intended to function as a lab book, teaching students topics conceptually, encouraging users to work out expectations by hand and by sketching out expected outcomes."—J. Michael Reed, Ecology

"I liked An Introduction to Methods and Models in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology and think it would be a very good text in the classroom. [The book] presents a nice selection of problems across the broad topics covered."—J. Michael Reed, Ecological Society of America

"[A]n excellent source of tools and inspiration and well suited to prepare the undergraduate student for the methodological and numerical approaches used in ecology and evolution."—Yann Clough, Basic and Applied Ecology

"The most enjoyable aspect of this book is that it is a true teaching guide. The authors expose students to quantitative methods using a very hands-on approach. This approach ensures students feel more comfortable with data analysis and quantitative methods, while also aiding them to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. A wealth of personal experience as a student and teacher has obviously gone into the creation of this book, and I would highly recommend it to educators dealing with components of this text"—.Brad J. Farmilo, Austral Ecology

"Braude and Low combine approaches and methodologies from ecology, evolution, and behavior, and emphasize quantitative exercises. Most other books that I'm familiar with are largely focused on either ecology or evolution. It makes sense to me to combine all of this material under a single cover. I can't think of another book like this one."—Jonathan Shurin, University of British Columbia

"A very worthwhile contribution. The authors expose students to quantitative methods using a very hands-on approach. The exercises increase students' comfort with data analysis and quantitative methods while also helping them to develop independent critical thinking and practical problem-solving skills. I do not know of any other textbook that offers this approach in evolution and ecology."—Suzanne H. Alonzo, Yale University

"This book is designed to teach basic ecological methods to undergraduates using a series of interactive exercises. It promotes real learning as opposed to memorization. It is a significant contribution to the field."—Susan L. Keen, University of California, Davis

"This is an interesting and even entertaining book of lab and field exercises that represent a wealth of personal experience in teaching the essentials of ecology and evolutionary theory, as well as the basics of the scientific method, study design, and analysis. The book includes many gems."—David K. Skelly, Yale University


Numerical Ecology with R

Numerical Ecology with R provides a long-awaited bridge between a textbook in Numerical Ecology and the implementation of this discipline in the R language. After short theoretical overviews, the authors accompany the users through the exploration of the methods by means of applied and extensively commented examples. Users are invited to use this book as a teaching companion at the computer. The travel starts with exploratory approaches, proceeds with the construction of association matrices, then addresses three families of methods: clustering, unconstrained and canonical ordination, and spatial analysis. All the necessary data files, the scripts used in the chapters, as well as the extra R functions and packages written by the authors, can be downloaded from a web page accessible through the Springer web site(http://adn.biol.umontreal.ca/

This book is aimed at professional researchers, practitioners, graduate students and teachers in ecology, environmental science and engineering, and in related fields such as oceanography, molecular ecology, agriculture and soil science, who already have a background in general and multivariate statistics and wish to apply this knowledge to their data using the R language, as well as people willing to accompany their disciplinary learning with practical applications. People from other fields (e.g. geology, geography, paleoecology, phylogenetics, anthropology, the social and education sciences, etc.) may also benefit from the materials presented in this book.

The three authors teach numerical ecology, both theoretical and practical, to a wide array of audiences, in regular courses in their Universities and in short courses given around the world. Daniel Borcard is lecturer of Biostatistics and Ecology and researcher in Numerical Ecology at Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada. François Gillet is professor of Community Ecology and Ecological Modelling at Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, France. Pierre Legendre is professor of Quantitative Biology and Ecology at Université de Montréal, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and ISI Highly Cited Researcher in Ecology/Environment.

The three authors teach numerical ecology, both theoretical and practical, to a wide array of audiences, in regular courses in their Universities and in short courses given around the world. Daniel Borcard is lecturer of Biostatistics and Ecology and researcher in Numerical Ecology at Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada. François Gillet is professor of Community Ecology and Ecological Modelling at Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, France. Pierre Legendre is professor of Quantitative Biology and Ecology at Université de Montréal, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and ISI Highly Cited Researcher in Ecology/Environment.

“It is aimed at people who have not used the free software R before, and covers how to install it onto your computer … . this book aims to provide a bridge between the theory and practice of numerical ecology. … provides a gentle introduction, reviewing various types of exploratory data analysis. … This will be of use by final year undergraduate project students, academics and researchers who are looking to extend their statistical repertoire.” (Bulletin of the British Ecological Society, Vol. 43 (1), March, 2012)

“The text is well written and ideal as either a course companion or for personal study. Each chapter explains clearly the objectives underlying the presentation of the material considered and each includes a final conclusion section so that the key points can be referred to subsequently. The authors’ text deserves to become a standard reference for anyone working in ecological science and more specifically, in numerical ecology.” (Carl M. O’Brien, International Statistical Review, Vol. 80 (1), 2012)

“This companion volume … shows how to use R and various packages pertinent to ecology. … this volume is an excellent contribution to the evolution of quantitative ecology and is a ‘must read.’” (Donald E. Myers, Technometrics, Vol. 54 (2), May, 2012)


Pollination Biology

Pollination Biology reviews the state of knowledge in the field of pollination biology. The book begins by tracing the historical trends in pollination research and the development of the two styles of pollination biology. This is followed by separate chapters on the evolution of the angiosperms the evolution of plant-breeding systems the geographical correlations between breeding habit, climate, and mode of pollen transfer and sexual selection in plants. Subsequent chapters examine the process of sexual selection through gametic competition in Geranium maculatum the effects of different gene movement patterns on plant population structure the foraging behavior of pollinators adaptive nature of floral traits and competitive interactions among flowering plants for pollinators. The book is designed to provide useful material for advanced undergraduate and graduate students wishing to familiarize themselves with modern pollination biology and also to provide new insights into specific problems for those already engaged in pollination research. The book is intended to be used for both teaching and research.

Pollination Biology reviews the state of knowledge in the field of pollination biology. The book begins by tracing the historical trends in pollination research and the development of the two styles of pollination biology. This is followed by separate chapters on the evolution of the angiosperms the evolution of plant-breeding systems the geographical correlations between breeding habit, climate, and mode of pollen transfer and sexual selection in plants. Subsequent chapters examine the process of sexual selection through gametic competition in Geranium maculatum the effects of different gene movement patterns on plant population structure the foraging behavior of pollinators adaptive nature of floral traits and competitive interactions among flowering plants for pollinators. The book is designed to provide useful material for advanced undergraduate and graduate students wishing to familiarize themselves with modern pollination biology and also to provide new insights into specific problems for those already engaged in pollination research. The book is intended to be used for both teaching and research.


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